Posts Tagged ‘raspberries’

Pruning Raspberries

Pruning Raspberries

Raspberry Patch

Pruning raspberries is essential because fruit is only produced on new raspberry canes. The old growth must be removed from your raspberry patch each year.

There are two types of raspberries:
an everbearing and

June bearing

Ever Bearers

Our favorite type of raspberry is the ever bearer / primocane. These raspberries bear fruit in the summer on canes that grow up in the spring.

It’s much easier to grow ever bearers than June bearers. After the first freeze in the fall of the year, cut off all the canes at ground level. Easy Pruning!

Use a wood chipper to chop up the old raspberry canes. Add the chips back into the garden soil. The organic matter helps improve the soil.

Ever Bearer Raspberries July 15



The chance of the raspberries getting cane borer is reduced when you cut off all the canes.

If you want a June and August crop of raspberries, you can do it with some extra work.

After it freezes in the fall, prune the tops off the canes that bore fruit during the summer. Prune these canes
3 ½ feet high. Next year, fruit will grow on the lower part of the cane.

These short canes will produce berries in June. In August, the new canes that grow from the roots will produce berries at the top of the cane. They will continue to produce fruit until it freezes.

When pruning raspberries this way, remember to prune out the short canes that bore fruit in June.

Pruned Raspberries

Most people don’t bother with getting this double crop because:

  • The raspberry plants produce two small crops instead of one large crop.
  • There’s a lot more work when pruning raspberries this way. It’s easier to cut off all the ever bearing canes each fall.

 

 

  • Caroline – mid to late August until first frost (going strong when first frost comes)
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